Explore: Iceland

With its glacial rivers, lava fields, spouting geysers and volcanic black-sand beaches, there’s nowhere on earth quite like Iceland – all against a backdrop of dramatic mountain ranges, spectacular waterfalls, and natural lagoons. It’s just as spectacular as you imagine.
Iceland waterfall Skogafoss in Icelandic nature landscape. Famous tourist attractions and landmarks destination in Icelandic nature landscape on South Iceland. Aerial drone view of top waterfall.

Holidays to Iceland

An over-abundance of geothermal energy makes Iceland a filmmakers’ paradise: you’ll no doubt recognise its landscapes from Game of Thrones and the James Bond film, Die Another Day. Wherever you stay, it’s easy to arrange half-day hiking, riding, Jeep tours or excursions to spot minke and humpback whales – and with quiet, well-maintained roads, Iceland is a self-drive holiday hotspot too.

With its glacial rivers, lava fields, spouting geysers and volcanic black-sand beaches, there’s nowhere on earth quite like Iceland… It’s just as spectacular as you imagine

Where to go

You’ll fly into capital, Reykjavik, on the shores of Faxaflói bay, so take a couple of days to get a feel for the rich culture and history of this Arctic island. Don’t miss the remains of a 10th-century Viking longhouse and the medieval manuscripts on display in The Culture House. And, if you’re lucky, you may even see the Northern Lights…

Leave enough time to relax in Reykjavik’s Blue Lagoon or take a hike in the Jokulsargljufur or Skaftafell National Parks, or perhaps tackle the challenging four-day hike from Laugavegurinn to Torsmork. The ‘Golden Circle’ tour of southern Iceland is a good way of glimpsing the best of the landscapes. Horse-lovers shouldn’t miss the chance to experience the ‘tolt’ (a comfortable pace between trot and canter) on an indigenous Icelandic horse.

When to go

During Iceland’s short tourist season, from June to August, temperatures are perfect for outdoor activities. At this time of year, there’s nearly 24 hours of sunlight and the climate is at its driest. The best months for seeing the Northern Lights are February, March, September and October.

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